Annals of African Medicine

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2022  |  Volume : 21  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 124--131

Chemotherapy-Associated nausea and vomiting: A cross-sectional survey of occurrence and management patterns at jos university teaching hospital, Nigeria


Kelvin Mogesa Manyega, Benjamin Nasara Joseph, Okunlola Charity Rotkangmwa, Maxwell P Dapar 
 Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacy Practice, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Jos, Jos, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Kelvin Mogesa Manyega
Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacy Practice, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Jos, Jos
Nigeria

Background: The management patterns for chemotherapy-associated nausea and vomiting (CANV) in Sub-Saharan African settings have not been previously reported. The objectives of this study were to describe the prescribing pattern of antiemetics for CANV, to assess their adherence to guidelines, and to determine the occurrence of CANV. Subjects and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study, with data extracted from the records of adult patients who received chemotherapy from 2015 to 2018 at Jos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network Harmonized Guidelines™ for Sub-Saharan Africa for Antiemesis Version 3.2018 was used to determine the extent of guideline adherence. Results: Records of 165 patients were analyzed. Majority of the patients (76.4%, n = 126) received moderate-to-high emetic risk intravenous (IV) chemotherapy. Out of 129 antiemetic prescriptions for acute-phase prophylaxis, ondansetron (75.2%), corticosteroids (61.2%), and promethazine (24.8%) were the most prescribed agents. In the delayed phase, 50 patients received prophylactic antiemetics in the order of corticosteroids, ondansetron, and promethazine at 74%, 34%, and 26%, respectively. Guideline adherence was low for the acute-phase (23.6%), delayed-phase (20.6%), and overall period (17.6%). Among inpatients (n = 85), occurrences of nausea were negligible, whereas acute vomiting (9%) and delayed vomiting (15%) levels were considerable. Not receiving highly emetogenic IV chemotherapy was associated with significantly lower odds for nausea or vomiting occurrence, odds ratio 0.228 (95% confidence interval 0.054–0.967). Conclusions: Antiemetic guideline adherence was low due to antiemetic under-prescribing. A few nausea and vomiting events were recorded predominantly among patients who received highly emetogenic IV chemotherapy.


How to cite this article:
Manyega KM, Joseph BN, Rotkangmwa OC, Dapar MP. Chemotherapy-Associated nausea and vomiting: A cross-sectional survey of occurrence and management patterns at jos university teaching hospital, Nigeria.Ann Afr Med 2022;21:124-131


How to cite this URL:
Manyega KM, Joseph BN, Rotkangmwa OC, Dapar MP. Chemotherapy-Associated nausea and vomiting: A cross-sectional survey of occurrence and management patterns at jos university teaching hospital, Nigeria. Ann Afr Med [serial online] 2022 [cited 2022 Sep 26 ];21:124-131
Available from: https://www.annalsafrmed.org/article.asp?issn=1596-3519;year=2022;volume=21;issue=2;spage=124;epage=131;aulast=Manyega;type=0